Trip

My First Camping Trip: What Should I Pack?

Going on your first camping trip? That is great! Camping is one of the most popular outdoor recreational activities today. However, since it’s your first time, you may find it somewhat difficult to decide what you need to take with you. Keeping this in mind, one of the most useful tools when it comes to preparing for your first camping trip is a travel checklist.

By creating a camping travel checklist, breaking it down into categories, and covering the things you may need for the trip, you can ensure you have everything you need to make your first camping trip a major success. To help you out, in this article, we have discussed the important categories your checklist should contain.

Food

Think of the total number of meals you will have to prepare during your first camping trip, and start planning and preparing ahead. If only two people are tagging along with you, you would not need to pack as much food as when you have a whole family camping with you. If you are planning to supplement your meals with the fish you catch during camping, make sure you have the necessary spices and other ingredients to prepare it properly. Again, the best thing you can do is to write down all the things you require on the checklist, so you do not forget anything.

Emergencies

This category is one of the most important. In the event of any unforeseen incident or emergency while you are on your camping trip, you will need some proper emergency equipment available to effectively handle the situation. You should include things like a first-aid kit, allergy medication, after-bite, bug repellent, and analgesic, as well as any medication you or anyone else needs to take regularly. Think of all the things you may require when you find yourself in a situation of emergency and list them under the emergency category.

Shelter

Clearly, you will require temporary shelter for the duration of your camping trip. So, consider including a quality tent or yurt, unless you are going to rent a cabin or cottage in the woods. Anything you keep inside a tent comes under this category. These include flashlights, pillows, beddings, cooking apparatus, glasses, plates, pots, pans, utensils, barbeque lighter, newspapers, and matches. All these necessities can easily be purchased from a camping store. Consider including all the things you may need to feel comfortable, live, and cook, under this category.

Clothing

Check the forecast of the location you plan on camping at, and pack your clothes accordingly. If there is ample space in your vehicle, pack for every type of weather, just to be on the safe side. Usually, it does rain when you are out camping during the spring. Moreover, make sure you do not forget toiletries!

Sporting Equipment

A camping trip is never complete without fun and games. Therefore, pack some sporting equipment everyone enjoys. If you plan on boating or hiking, you should have the relevant equipment on your checklist.
So, plan ahead by writing down all the essentials on your camping travel checklist, and you will have everything you need to enjoy your trip!

How to Plan Your Child’s First Fishing Trip

Many fishing enthusiasts dream of the day their children will join them on the water. If your child is finally old enough to handle a reel and you’re getting ready for that milestone first fishing trip, here are some tips to help you make the experience a memorable one.

Get Excited
Once you’ve announced to your child that the two of you are going fishing, mark the day on a calendar and commence a countdown. Help engage your child in the planning by going shopping together for a fishing license and some new fishing gear. Choose some extra tackle from your own box and hand it down to your child as a gift to make the occasion special.

Let your child help choose the location. Point out a few options on a map, explain the pros and cons of each spot, and decide on the best place together. Try to avoid steep or slippery locations, and look for a spot that is likely to yield fish.

Before the big day, teach your child how to clean and oil a reel as well as assemble, disassemble and put a new line on it. Allow your child to practice casting in the yard with a lightweight sinker; you can even set up a garbage can or other target to help build accuracy.

Get Ready
Let your child help you get everything ready the night before, including snacks, lunches and fishing equipment. Nothing spoils a fishing trip like being cold, so bring plenty of layers and extra clothes in case you get wet.

To help keep your child occupied during down time, bring a small bag of activities and keep in mind some other activities the two of you can do in case the fish aren’t biting: Go on a hike, learn to skip rocks, catch frogs, go geo-caching (if you have a GPS unit), etc.

Get Outside
The day of your big trip, wake your child up early to allow plenty of time to get ready and share a special breakfast, either at home or at a diner. Kids tend to remember occasions on which they had to get up extra-early.

Once you arrive at your destination, let your child help unpack and give him or her your full attention as you prepare and bait your reels together. The first time your child gets a bite, let him or her reel it in alone as you coach and cheer from the sidelines. If the first fish is lost, then help with the next one. Let your child know it’s common for a fish to get away.

Back at home, make a point of bragging about what a great job your child did. If you’ve played your cards right, you’ll have a fishing partner for life.

~Flora Richards-Gustafson, 2010

How to Plan Your Child’s First Fishing Trip

Many fishing enthusiasts dream of the day their children will join them on the water. If your child is finally old enough to handle a reel and you’re getting ready for that milestone first fishing trip, here are some tips to help you make the experience a memorable one.

Get Excited
Once you’ve announced to your child that the two of you are going fishing, mark the day on a calendar and commence a countdown. Help engage your child in the planning by going shopping together for a fishing license and some new fishing gear. Choose some extra tackle from your own box and hand it down to your child as a gift to make the occasion special.

Let your child help choose the location. Point out a few options on a map, explain the pros and cons of each spot, and decide on the best place together. Try to avoid steep or slippery locations, and look for a spot that is likely to yield fish.

Before the big day, teach your child how to clean and oil a reel as well as assemble, disassemble and put a new line on it. Allow your child to practice casting in the yard with a lightweight sinker; you can even set up a garbage can or other target to help build accuracy.

Get Ready
Let your child help you get everything ready the night before, including snacks, lunches and fishing equipment. Nothing spoils a fishing trip like being cold, so bring plenty of layers and extra clothes in case you get wet.

To help keep your child occupied during down time, bring a small bag of activities and keep in mind some other activities the two of you can do in case the fish aren’t biting: Go on a hike, learn to skip rocks, catch frogs, go geo-caching (if you have a GPS unit), etc.

Get Outside
The day of your big trip, wake your child up early to allow plenty of time to get ready and share a special breakfast, either at home or at a diner. Kids tend to remember occasions on which they had to get up extra-early.

Once you arrive at your destination, let your child help unpack and give him or her your full attention as you prepare and bait your reels together. The first time your child gets a bite, let him or her reel it in alone as you coach and cheer from the sidelines. If the first fish is lost, then help with the next one. Let your child know it’s common for a fish to get away.

Back at home, make a point of bragging about what a great job your child did. If you’ve played your cards right, you’ll have a fishing partner for life.

~Flora Richards-Gustafson, 2010